Court eviction

UNFORTUNATELY, NOT ALL TENANTS VACATE A PROPERTY ON EXPIRY OF THE RELEVANT SECTION NOTICE AND IT MAY BECOME NECESSARY TO GO TO COURT—THE LANDLORD MUST SERVE THE RELEVANT NOTICE AND WAITED UNTIL THE NOTICE PERIOD HAS EXPIRED BEFORE ANY ACTION CAN BE TAKEN TO OBTAIN A POSSESSION ORDER FROM THE COURT, IT IS A CRIMINAL OFFENCE TO EVICT A TENANT OTHER THAN BY OBTAINING A COURT ORDER FOR POSSESSION.

First step—

When you serve notice

It is important that you keep a copy of the notices that have been served and how it was served. You must also be able to present this to the court just in case the tenant denies receiving the notice.
The next step is sometimes quite confusing for Landlords and if not dealt with correctly may result in you not being successful in court.

After the notice—

If your notice fails

If the court orders possession, then the tenant will be given a date to which they must vacate the property, this is generally 14 days later—if the tenant remains in the property after receiving the court order, bailiffs can be instructed to remove the tenant from the property.
Expert analysis of your individual case and advice on the correct path is essential, so it is important to use a specialist firm of advisors.

What we can do for you

We will assist you to draft, prepare and advise you accordingly as to what documentation you would need to serve to the courts in regards to recovering rent arrears and possessions of the property. We will advise you of all matters relating to the case and also assist you in arranging representation through a firm of solicitors who will present your case in court if necessary. †


† Disclaimer : We are an independent specialist eviction services company who assists landlords throughout England & Wales. All our clients hearings are carried out by advocates instructed by a firm of solicitors who are regulated by the SRA. We are not, nor are we required to be regulated by the Law Society or the SRA. We are not solicitors, a firm of solicitors, nor do we purport to be a firm of solicitors